Keeping it easy with a clear vision

We had just finished filming a shot for the television segment and wanted to capture some different views. I called our contact and asked for more action shots. I wanted b-roll of action, not just students in a classroom. As we briefly talked, I sensed a divide between us.

Then I realized what it was; she didn’t know what I wanted to do. So then I explained that the segment will have the interviewer speaking and then have different videos appear throughout the interview. This will make the segment visually engaging as well as informative. Ideally, it will encourage parents and students to learn more about the program. “Oh, now I understand” she said and immediately had some ideas that fit perfectly.

As I concluded the call, I realized a few important things. The power of a clear vision and being able to articulate it clearly. Personally, I know I can have a vision of what I want, but often articulating it clearly is a challenge. I don’t like to box myself into a certain “thing”. I like to have options so at times I can be a little indecisive. Yet, when I know exactly what I want and can communicate that clearly, everything just falls into place.

It surely makes life easier for all the people I need to work with to achieve a goal as well as makes my life easier as I know what I’m going for. Now here’s the fun part, taking it to a new level. How much different would my life be if I communicated my soulful, heartfelt vision with clarity and ease when I prayed? If the physical can become that much better, how much better can the spiritual?

Hmmm….I have a list of goals to accomplish, I’m going to revisit them from my heart and with clarity. Whether it’s in prayer, to a friend, or someone I just met, I’m going to truly feel what I want and be able to communicate that vision clearly. What fun!

Into the Light

Do you know anyone who might want this plant? I asked my friend who was on Skype and knows everything botanical. She wanted to see it, so I went out to the patio, drug it out of the corner and held the laptop in front of it.

It is a frangipani, or what I affectionately call it a stick plant. The shoots stood about 4 feet tall and were just bare sticks; nothing really interesting.

I left it in the middle of the patio so I could just grab it when it was time to take it away. After a week, it appeared to be have green on the ends of the nubs. The person who wanted it was unavailable and I was too lazy to move it back to the shaded corner.

After two weeks, the nubs had turned green and it was obvious this plant was growing. I didn’t call the person who wanted it because now I was curious what was going to happen.

Fast forward to 4 weeks later and this plant is alive!! The previous bare nubs have 3-4 inches (yes I measured!) of new growth and each one has many big green leaves and bright, fragrant flowers have appeared. Needless to say, it’s thriving and I’m keeping it.

So what was the change? I moved it from the shaded, corner of the patio where it just sat in oblivion. Sitting under a tree, there wasn’t much water, little sun, and no attention.

Moving it to the center of the patio, placed in the direct sun and it was fully exposed to soak up the morning dew or afternoon rain. Plus as it started growing, I’d walk over and notice it. Now I wander over and smell the fragrant flowers and amazed at how tall it’s getting.

As I look at changes I’m planning in my life that sometimes seem just short of overwhelming, I look at this plant. It wasn’t a massive change that made it thrive, it was a shift in position. From the shade into the light was all it needed.

Maybe some of these changes to aren’t that difficult after all……maybe I just need to shift more into the light, where I can be exposed to the experiences that help me grow.

Tackle Life like a Sticky Frog

Sticky frogs are common in Florida, especially where I live. My first encounter with a sticky frog was quite memorable. With curiosity of a cat, I had to get closer and see what it was.

The sticky frog did not hop away as expected, but jumped right on my chest!! Being a real man, I just watched it and calmly said “cool”. Yeah, right…good thing no one had a video camera because I screamed so loud my friend came outside.
Through her hysterical laughter, I was told “you scream like a girl”. The laughter only got louder when she found it was because of a frog. I’m glad I’m so entertaining……

Tonight I was out for a walk around our circle when I saw a sticky frog in the road. With all animals, big or small, I gently move them out of the road before they become part of it. As I’m leaning over with a stick to push it away, the frog intently looked right at me and fearlessly jumped onto my arm.

Sorry, no screaming from me this time:) I took it to some bushes, but it refused to dismount. So I resumed my walk around the circle with the sticky frog hanging out on my arm. It would change positions occasionally for a better view, but basically sat there the whole time, enjoying the free ride.

The frog’s response to me made re-think of how I approach unknown situations. When confronted with a situation that is unknown and seemingly large, I will usually choose avoid verses confront. Most animals will do the same; come within a few feet, they are gone quickly.

However the sticky frog jumps right on for a closer look. Seeming to ask “What is this big think that keeps following me? “

What would happen if we did the same for those challenges that we tend to avoid? If we faced them would they really turn out so big? Would they metaphorically scream and run away? Maybe they would turn out to be good things instead of something we feared?

Obviously if it’s something life threatening, be smart and get away from it.

As in the case of tonight’s encounter, the frog faced the challenge and received a free ride around the neighborhood. With the frog on my arm, I walked slower for a change; saw the stars, clouds, and other things I normally miss because I’m in a hurry. It worked out well for both of us.

So the next time a seemingly large or unknown situation comes your way, be like the sticky frog and face it. You’re likely to learn some new insights and find some good things.

And what happened to my passenger that night? After riding on my arm for the mile walk around, I put him in some bushes near where I found him and he happily dismounted. I can only imagine the story he told when asked “where have you been?”